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    Turkey Thread

    Most of Turkey is for the most part a country that is transcontinental and trans-regional between Europe and West Asia/Near East/Middle East. It connects the Balkans of Southeastern Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, the Iranian Plateau/Kurdistan, and the Caucasus/Black Sea region. It is the most diverse and populous West Asian country. Now as for the question whether Turks of Turkey are actually is, without bias, the answer is that the region is just a Turkified part of West Asia. The original Turco-Mongol of Central Asia are very different from the people of Turkey and while Mongoloid admixture is found in Turkey keep in mind that it's found all over West Asia and even Europe so to say Turks of Turkey are of Central Asian is wrong.

    From Wikipedia.org

    "In population genetics, research has been made to study the genetic origins of the modern Turkish people in Turkey. These studies sought to determine whether the modern Turks have a stronger genetical affinity with the Turkic peoples of Central Asia from where the Seljuk Turks began migrating to Anatolia following the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, which led to the establishment of the Anatolian Seljuk Sultanate in the late 11th century; or if they instead largely descended from the indigenous peoples of Anatolia who were culturally assimilated during the Seljuk and Ottoman periods, with assimilation policies such as the devshirme system and the jizya tax.

    Autosomal studies with recent methodology estimate the Central Asian contribution in Turkish people at 13-15%[1][2][3] noting that results may indicate previous population movements (e.g. migration, admixture) or genetic drift, given the fact that Europe and South Asia have some genetic relatedness.

    The largest autosomal study on Turkish genetics predicted that the weight of Central Asian migration legacy of the Turkish people is estimated at 21.7%.[4] The authors conclude on the basis of previous studies that "South Asian contribution to Turkey's population was significantly higher than East/Central Asian contributions, suggesting that the genetic variation of medieval Central Asian populations may be more closely related to South Asian populations, or that there was continued low level migration from South Asia into Anatolia." They note that these weights are not direct estimates of the migration rates as the original donor populations are not known, and the exact kinship between current East Asians and the medieval Oghuz Turks is uncertain. For instance, genetic pools of Central Asian Turkic peoples is particularly diverse and modern Oghuz Turkmens living in Central Asia are with slightly higher West Eurasian genetic component than East Eurasian.[5][6]

    Several studies have concluded that the genetic haplogroups indigenous to Western Asia have the largest share in the gene pool of the present-day Turkish population.[2][2][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] An admixture analysis determined that the Anatolian Turks share most of their genetic ancestry with non-Turkic populations in the region and the 12th century is set as an admixture date.[14] However, isolates with dominant Central Asian genetic makeup were found in an Afshar village near Ankara"

    "The question to what extent a gene flow from Central Asia to Anatolia has contributed to the current gene pool of the Turkish people, and what the role is in this of the 11th century settlement by Oghuz Turks, has been the subject of several studies. A factor that makes it difficult to give reliable estimates, is the problem of distinguishing between the effects of different migratory episodes. Thus, although the Turks settled in Anatolia (peacefully or after war events) with cultural significance, including the introduction of the Turkish language and Islam, the genetic significance from Central Asia might have been slight.[8][16]

    Some of the Turkic peoples originated from Central Asia and therefore are possibly related with Xiongnu.[17] A majority (89%) of the Xiongnu sequences can be classified as belonging to Asian haplogroups and nearly 11% belong to European haplogroups.[17] This findings indicate that the contacts between European and Asian populations were anterior to the Xiongnu culture,[17] and it confirms results reported for two samples from an early 3rd century B.C. Scytho-Siberian population.[18]

    According to another archeological and genetic study in 2010, the DNA found in three skeletons in 2000-year-old elite Xiongnu cemetery in Northeast Asia belonged to C3, D4 and including R1a. The evidence of paternal R1a support the Kurgan expansion hypothesis for the Indo-European expansion from the Volga steppe region.[19] As the R1a was found in Xiongnu people[19] and the present-day people of Central Asia[20] Analysis of skeletal remains from sites attributed to the Xiongnu provides an identification of dolichocephalic Mongoloid, ethnically distinct from neighboring populations in present-day Mongolia.[21]

    According to a different genetic research on 75 individuals from various parts of Turkey, Mergen et al. revealed that the "genetic structure of the mtDNAs in the Turkish population bears similarities to Turkic Central Asian populations".[15]

    Overall, modern Turks are most related to neighbouring West Asian populations. A study looking into allele frequencies suggested that there was a lack of genetic relationship between contemporary Mongols and Turks, despite their linguistic and cultural relationship.[22] In addition, another study looking into HLA genes allele distributions indicated that Anatolians did not significantly differ from other Mediterranean populations.[16] Multiple studies suggested an elite dominance-driven linguistic replacement model to explain the adoption of Turkish language by Anatolian indigenous inhabitants.[11][12]
    "

    "According to one autosomal analysis, the Turkish genetic pool falls within the following categories: 38% Caucasian, 11% European early farmers, 7% European hunter-gatherers, 14% South Central Asians, 10% Near Eastern, 3% Ancestral Altaic, 5% Tungus Altaic, 3% East Siberian, 2% South East Asian, 3% North African, 1% Arctic, 1% South Indian, 1% Austronesian.[34] The category Caucasus also consists the largest part of the genetics of several Turkic peoples, including the Turkmens.

    East Eurasian admixture solely ranges from 0-3% in Eastern Turkey (which has a Kurdish-majority population in some provinces), through 6-9% in Central Anatolia, to 13-18% in Western Anatolia"

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